Wayne Fischer

3/03/18 - 7/04/18

  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics
  • Puls Ceramics

Showing at the same time

Ahryun Lee (Personal show 2018).

American Wayne Fischer received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1978 at the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, USA. He is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics, elected by his peers from around the world. He currently -and for many years - has lived and worked in the Var, a department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur in Provencien, southeastern France. He is the winner of numerous prizes in international biennial competitions and the winner of the prestigious Bettencourt Prize.

In addition to his art, Fischer is utterly fascinated with fossils and the origins of life. Bringing this passion into his ceramic art, he has chosen porcelain as his preferred material for its quite incredible structural possibilities.

Fischer is fascinated by the almost infinite variety of life in all of its forms. His slab-folded and thrown ceramic art creates enormously questioning and disturbing objects. Fischer developed his technique in the late 1970s and has remained faithful to it. His work is at once sensual, organic and sometimes disturbing. In his hands, the very fineness of porcelain itself is suggestive of pulsing life. To this he adds surfaces, crevices and fissures reminiscent of human skin; skin that conceals muscle and veins, bone and viscera, either bulging or hidden beneath. The shapes and curves can even suggest the growth that takes place within the womb. His glazes highlight these strange shapes and give them depth and even more mystery.
His objects deliberately hover between the abstract and the figurative. This is done with the intent to give free rein to a multitude of interpretations. He wants the viewer’s imagination to experience a powerful dreamlike imagery. While his works are often very round and full, with those in this show there is greater emphasis upon undulations of the surface that reveal internal structure and therefore the hidden qualities of life. Fischer’s art simultaneously suggests both power and fragility.

High definition pictures

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