Steen Ipsen

25/02/06 > 01/04/06

  • Steen Ipsen
  • Steen Ipsen
  • Steen Ipsen
  • Steen Ipsen
  • Steen Ipsen

Showing at the same time

Jussi Ojala (Personal show 2006).

Steen Ipsen graduated from The Danish Design School in 1990 and ever since he has been one of the most important ceramists of the young generation in Denmark. For eight years he was the head of department for ceramics and glass in The Danish Design School and his work has been shown both in Europe and In the States. Steen Ipsen already exhibited in Puls in 2003 and now he is back to show us more of his sexy and juicy ceramics.

Steen Ipsen says about his work :

“I seek a complex and decorative ceramic expression that is kaleidoscopic, overwhelming and has lush visual and tactile appeal.My work is theme and variation. I make work in series, turning over and challenging, repeating and varying a shape or decorative theme until individual pieces remain as unique objects. The works are structured and constructed, following certain rules. Elements of form are repeated and combined according to geometric systems or organic and mineral growth principles, such as cell division, gemmation and crystallization. For me, it’s very much about the relation between methodical and chaotic, simple and complex.

I work in a decorative ceramic expression involving both form and decoration. Decoration is integrated into the form, and the form itself is spatially decorative. Different layers of decorative devices engage in a complex interaction, by turns emerging, disappearing and coming together to form a whole again. There is something festive, colourful and seductive about decoration – a joy and an abundance that overwhelm you visually, tactilely and physically, all but blowing you away. Decoration gives you a titillating, pleasurable sensation of excess. But is excess really enough?

A measure of randomness and irregularity has found its way into my work over the years, in combination with the structured and methodical. Tight patterns have yielded to thick layers of freely flowing, dripping glazes in many colours, both softening and enhancing the constructions. The shapes, too, are turning extreme and extravagant. They are still made up of repetitions and combinations of elements, but I now combine them according to personal systematic.”