Shozo Michikawa

9/09/06 > 7/10/06

  • Shozo Michikawa
  • Shozo Michikawa
  • Shozo Michikawa
  • Shozo Michikawa
  • Shozo Michikawa
  • Shozo Michikawa
  • Shozo Michikawa

Showing at the same time

Inger Rokkjær (Personal show 2006).

Shozo Michikawa was born in Hokkaido in 1953 and is today one of the leading Japanese ceramists. He studied at Aoyama Gakuin University . Now he is based in Seto, Aichi, an area blessed with high-quality clay and an abundance of wooden fuel that has been a centre for ceramic production since ancient times. Michikawa has exhibited widely in Japan and also in China , the Philippines , Mongolia , France , New York and London .

Shozo Michikawa absorbs endless artistic inspiration from the natural scenery of his hometown Hokkaido with its white snow, black rocks, the sea, volcanoes, the desert and withered trees… His works are energetic, as though bursting with lava from a volcano. It is no coincidence that Shozo Michikawa grew up at the foot of the Mt. Usu volcano, which is still active to this day. With respect to nature as his source of inspiration Shozo Michikawa says: “The energy of nature is truly immense. No matter how much our sciences and civilization might evolve, the power of human beings is inconsequential in the face of human threats such as typhoons, earthquakes, tsunamis and erupting volcanoes. I think this is why the works created by the natural world, for instance the patterns formed by the winds on the desert sands, or a majestic cliff overlooking the ocean, contain a power that can never be imitated by human hands. My own creative activities have been inspired by various phenomena in the natural world, even those that can be seen in everyday life.”

The works that Shozo Michikawa will exhibit at Puls belong to two different groups: the natural ash and the tanka series. Michikawa's pots, with their irregular shape, granular texture and rich earthen hues are so poetic in their appearance that they have been likened to “haikus in clay”. Shozo Michikawa can therefore rightfully be described as the “poet of pots”.