Noemi Niederhauser

12/01/13 > 23/02/13

  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser
  • Noemi Niederhauser

Showing at the same time

Paolo Polloniato (Personal show 2013).

Swiss Ceramist Noemi Niederhauser °1984 has said that she sometimes feels that she wanders through whatever environment she happens to be in like a collector of contemporary of curiosities. What she ends up with are materials, shapes, colors, feelings and memories. She then divertes and reassembles these various fragments from daily life to create her own unique collection, a particular reading of the world. Niederhauser is a prize winning artist that has exhibited across Europe, Japan and South Korea. This ten piece show for her first exhiition at Puls is entitled In Between Generations.

A graduate of the Applied Art School of Vevey,Switzerland, Niederhauser continued her MA studies at the prestigious Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. Professing to being not deeply interested in technical know-how, it is certainly an intrinsic part of her process for this collection. She has used materials and advanced processes for their result, for what they suggest, and for their visual properties. “In my work, there is often a concept of deceit in relation to materials. They often suggest that which they are not; that which does not seem to be what they really are. My aesthetic world is built on ambivalence and my approach proceeds by shifts and hybridization between the ephemeral and the archaic, the primitive and developed, the weak and the strong. In this game of confrontation between conflicting shapes and textures, the visible often eludes understanding.There is dissonance between shape and texture. An object’s surfaces become illusions upon which we can project ourselves but foremost where we are sure to be surprised.”

This is work that asks specific questions that are not necessarily linked. What connects them is the construction of an unusual and anachronistic atmosphere which lures the viewer. The materiality of the works raises curiosity by its appearance and therefore requires careful observation. This is an attempt to provoke a slight misstep in the beholder, to require them to perceive reality in another way. Certainties and beliefs are dissected to reveal our true relationship to the world that surrounds us and the various strategies each of us has chosen to comprehend it.

The textures encountered on these pieces is the result of a year-long study of the poetry and technology of creating illussions. The coral-like surface for instance, is the application of glaze with a machine not unlike one used to make artificial snow. You do not know with certainty exactly what you are looking at, yet every step of the creation of the object can be decerned. These works are boxes, containers inspired by the major European manufacturers between the 17th and 19th century. Yet here they are the opposite of the perfection of the originals. Instead of seamless joins,now they are distorted with the traces of the making still visible. Thus, they carry parts of two different epochs, thereby creating a dialogue between a past and a present.