Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...

4/06/11 > 16/07/11

  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...

For this next show at Puls Contemporary Ceramics it’s my great pleasure to be able to invite some of my excellent colleagues to exhibit with me in the gallery. I have asked three ceramists, whose work I rate very highly, and whom I respect particularly for their persistent efforts to keep their personal artistic projects fresh and new. I share their belief in poetic power; their desire to present other realities through the work.

The exhibition does not have a common theme, but reflects what each of us consider important to work with just now. Behind all the apparent differences in the way we choose to work in the medium, I am confident that viewers will detect what we may share in terms of artistic approach.

Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl

In recent years I have been working with objects, where I make juxtapositions of pre-existing natural form and modelled form - or shapes and patterns arrived at by digital means, to create a poetic universe. An encounter of the man made form (by me) and the genetically determined shape, e.g. represented by a length of branch from my stack of firewood.

For this exhibition I have worked around the idea of a branch. In various ways I have considered the essentials of a branch in its shape and surface structure. As a sculptural object, the length of branch is intriguing to work with, in that it inevitably brings about a vision of the non-present. It’s form, the cut sides, the dynamic interaction with the surrounding space – all of this is basic sculptural matter.
In these works, the direct imprint of the anonymous length of branch - through casting in clay, is put in a dialogue with hand-modelled variations of it. Both as a meeting of form and with surface patterns as part of the game. The materials, by which the works now are constituted, place them in a non-natural-sphere: As ceramic figures, they now depend on being transformed by colour, texture and added ornamental detail, from the easily recognizable into a more open universe.

Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl works mainly in various ceramic materials and employs 2D and 3D-digital methods for his experimenting with objects that integrate digitally based visual universes into the physical expression.

The inspiration for Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl's works springs from a serial work-process where the visual expression gradually crystallizes through a long series of experiments. Ultimately, the combinations of form, ornament and image will appear simple and easy to decode, while remaining open to a variety of possible interpretations of content. 

Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl's works are represented in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Danish Museum of Art & Design in Copenhagen, the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design in Oslo, Röhsska Museum in Gothenburg, Musée des Arts Decoratifs in Paris and MIMA in Middlesbrough, England, and in many private collections in Europe and the US. Recent exhibition activities include ‘The Digital Clay’ at the Danish Museum of Art & Design in Copenhagen (2008) and "END" - English/Norwegian/Danish exhibition group, ceramic exhibition at the Danish Museum of Art & Design in Copenhagen (2007). Available publications were issued in connection with both exhibitions. Master’s Degree from the Royal College of Art in London in 1990

Alison Britton

My work explores the pot form and seeks to stretch definitions of such an object. This includes thoughts about connection and disjunction with ceramic history, painting and sculpture, relationships of form and surface. Differences between verbal and visual expression are an area of friction that I work with, seeing how fiction might relate to form.

The control and non-control of skills and materials, risk and certainty, and the breadth of expression achievable with a limited palette of kinds of pigment and glaze, are my interests in this recent body of work. Loose allusions to tableware without addressing the constraints of function, and the value of imperfection, are current concerns.

Alison Britton was part of the radical group of Royal College of Art graduates in the early 1970's whose work laid the foundations for what became known as "The New Ceramics". Working from a London studio for more than three decades, Britton also writes, and with Martina Margetts co-curated the contemporary ceramics exhibition The Raw and the Cooked for the Museum of Modern Art in Oxford in 1993.

She is a Senior Tutor in the Ceramics and Glass Department of the RCA, and was awarded the OBE in 1990. Since 1998 her work has been represented by Barrett Marsden Gallery, London, now known as Marsden Woo. She is represented in many museum collections as well as private collections worldwide.

Karen Bennicke

My works are spatial visions. Constructions - reminiscent of architecture - that constitute a kind of formbearing membranes between the exterior and the interior. Light and subsequently shadow, of course, are the main agents in a process of intuitive, mathematical building up of sculptures - which are operating in the field between something distinct, with rather recognizable, functional references, and something undefined, that takes place between the harmonious and the almost chaotic. I try to eliminate the distance between the logical/concrete world of form, that we know from everyday life, and the illogical, unknown and absurd.

Karen Bennicke has been a remarkable profile in Danish and international contemporary ceramics for more than three decades, with an impressive range of exhibitions behind her. She mainly works thematically with sculpture, wall objects and private or public commisions.

Her work is represented in museum collections worldwide: Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Designmuseum Danmark, Copenhagen; ?Kunstmuseet Trapholt, Kolding DK; ?The National Museum, Stockholm; ?Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, Germany; ?Gifu Museum of Modern Ceramics, Japan, among many others...

Marianne Nielsen

As a ceramist I essentially address the underlying cultural meaning of ceramics. I wish to present the traditional creative process that forms the basis for our understanding of the objects’ identity. Highlighting the iconic power of the most trivial objects.

Knitting constitutes the basis for my work with hand-modelled wall-objects in stoneware. Turned into ceramics, the stiches become pattern. When delineating a theme in this way you elevate it: knitting being a very mundane subject matter, that does not exist independently on it’s own terms. The circular shape of the works relates formally to the ceramic dish or plate, but in terms of knitting it is an impossibility – a ceramic fiction.

It is the commonplace familiarity of things, that interests me; I wish to draw attention to the iconographic strength comprised in this.

Marianne Nielsen studied at Designskolen in Kolding, Denmark from 1994 to 1999 and soon after worked for a while at The Royal Copenhagen Porcelain Manufacturer with the project “Fremtidens spisestel” (Dinnerware of the Future). She works in her own studio in Copenhagen since 2000. Her one-off work has been shown in many exhibitions throughout Denmark and Europe. 

Within the world of ceramics, Marianne Nielsen belongs to a special category of phenomenologists, of a sort, who for the sake of comprehension simply choose to express their observations and considerations through ceramics. – and hence the conventional ceramics descriptions fall short in her company.