Love Your Figure II

3/03/12 > 7/04/12

  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II
  • Love Your Figure II

Gitte Jungersen °1967, Denmark

My new series of works is titled “Place to be Lost”. They are all made with found porcelain figurines and additional material. The work addresses the dichotomy between high art and low, combining appropriated kitsch and highly crafted works of art. I use the found porcelain animals as mirrors for the viewer’s own identity, blending the figurine’s stories with the viewer’s own. These works are about being human; about identity and about the anxiety of uncontrollable conditions, at once fascinating and repulsive.

I try to retain a sketch-like roughness, giving the works a vague feeling of being unfinished, still in process. The porcelain animals have been captured in frozen movements yet now joined with traces of the drama happening in the kiln, when the new material is boiling and highly reactive. Thus, how the materials behave becomes part of the narrative.

Maria Rubinke °1985, Denmark

Rubinke studied at the Glass- and Ceramic school, Bornholm. Since graduating in 2008 she has attracted an enormous amount of attention with her sculptures, which break with the traditional aesthetic one associates with small, charming porcelain figurines. Their inherent innocence is put at risk in the artist's works, where various catastrophes have resulted in fragmentation and deformation. In one series of objects the traditional porcelain doll is removed from its idealized world and placed on the battlefield of subconscious desire. Here violence and aggression are played out in bloody tableaux in sharp contrast to the decorative delicacy of the material. The scenarios are always related to the mind of the artist. 

Louise Hindsgavl °1973, Denmark

At first glance, the porcelain figurines of Louise Hindsgavl are disarmingly pretty and rather light and airy. They seem in one word nice. Look closely and instead of the pleasantly cute or even beautiful, you are confronted with disoriented, helpless individuals who are trying to find their way in a world that no one truly understands or who has much more than a modicum of control. Hindsgavl probes under the thin skin of glaze to reveal individuals, cruel yet innocent in their cruelty just because they do not know any better. “My figures are often a mixture of bits of man and bits of animal and in that way move their stories into a mythological world.” This is how she creates scenarios less immediately intimidating and entices the spectator a little closer. She creates the expectation of something harmless. What the viewer gets is in fact bizarre and surrealistic creatures engaged in strange and perverse relationships. Under their white, delicate, and genteel skin, they emanate violence, mutilation, obscenity, and dark humour. Everything is turned upside down. Class differences are momentarily abolished and repressed sexual energies are let loose.

Cathy Coëz °1968, France

Cathy Coëz is a multidisciplinary artist working and living in Brussels. The artist focuses solely on the object that she revisits, manipulates, and transform into sculptures. The china figures found at flea markets in Brussels can still be discerned under the artist's manipulations and artistic attack.

The exhibited pieces belong to a series of works produced in 2011.

These sculptures are metaphors of human behavior and its consequences. The most desperate and eternal of all : war.

The dog - man's best friend - has been chosen due to its kitsch dimension and ugliness, to represent the figure of the warrior, ironically bringing up the absurdity of our destiny and fate. 

Kim Simonsson °1974, Finland

Since graduating from University of Arts and Design in Helsinki in 2000 – and not least after receiving the award of Young Artist of the Year in Finland 2004, Kim Simonson has achieved great international recognition. His works imply a criticism of authority and his nature-size children and animals – mainly deers, rabbits, bloodhounds and greyhounds are all victims of adult actions. The hand-sculpted works take a stand of issues as diverse as materialism, pollution and the norms and fears established by the church. Strongly inspired by the Japanese manga comics – Kim Simonsson has successfully created a synthesis of Western aesthetics and Asian pop culture.