Louise Hindsgavl

5/02/04 > 12/03/04

  • Louise Hindsgavl
  • Louise Hindsgavl
  • Louise Hindsgavl
  • Louise Hindsgavl
  • Louise Hindsgavl
  • Louise Hindsgavl
  • Louise Hindsgavl
  • Louise Hindsgavl

Showing at the same time

Bodil Manz (Personal show 2004).

Louise Hindsgavl about her work: The figurine

The porcelain figurine has held my interest for some time. It belongs to a ceramic genre that boasts many virtues and that has brought forth figurines that could best be described with the word 'nice'. Those classic figurines seem harmless and represent an idealised and romanticised world.

There exists another world that I would like to shed some new light on.

My interest has several underlying reasons. First and foremost, the opportunity to directly tell a tale appeals to me. Another aspect is the chance to challenge and rearrange the vast and tradition-laden baggage that the figurine is associated with.

In other words, my figurines lean on the classical figurines, but with a twist. All the virtues stand to fall and decay and the little stories are turned on their heads with a sense of wicked foreboding. And all within the frame of the inoffensive figurine centrepiece.

All the pieces are made of porcelain. Porcelain exudes such a fine note of civilisation, thus underlining the contrast to my stories and at the same time clarifying the reference to the classical figurine. The pieces are made out of bits of toys and other everyday bric-a-brac to tie the stories to our contemporary lives.