Hugo Meert

17/10/09 > 14/11/09

  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Hugo Meert
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...
  • Martin Bodilsen Kaldahl invites...

Showing at the same time

Wim Borst (Personal show 2009).

Hugo Meert °1964 in Belgium , has won several prizes - both in Belgium and abroad. For his first exhibition at Puls Gallery he has created a new series of work, the Terrarist Vases which he will show along with his well-known seriesRead a Made.

The containers of the series Read a Made, by Hugo Meert, seem to have been turned in an ironworks, with their regular, neutral appearance. They certainly evoke a mechanical technique, with no affect and especially with no really determined intention other than that of “making.” But this is not really the case. They are made to the shape of letters, or rather words, which can be read in their profile. They are chosen with particular care and presented vertically, like signs: nice, crafty, lovely, fine, cute and so on. The words refer to criteria, to value judgments, well-defined categories in which man-made objects will be catalogued and enclosed.

Hugo Meert thus evokes our modes of behavior when faced with such objects: our way of mentally and materially conceiving them on the basis of these predetermined references precisely by a mode of thought, by aesthetic choices or societal attitudes.

Hugo Meert employs a certain humor to treat the often difficult relations between craft and art. In ruling out any affect, he frees the work from the dangers of intellectual determinism. Work produced in a certain cultural environment would inevitably be alienated. On the other hand, industrial products would be quite incorruptible. By deciding to make things pretty or beautiful, by choosing to make craft or art work, one unconsciously predetermines the form and general aspect of the objects. They are constrained and limited, as is the relation we expect to have with them. Designing and thus creating in full consciousness may well provide an escape from this situation.

Yves Peltier, General Commissioner of the International Biennial of Contemporary Ceramics, Vallauris (F) 2008

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Hugo Meert