Bente Skjøttgaard

16/04/11 > 28/05/11

  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard
  • Bente Skjøttgaard

Showing at the same time

Morten Løbner Espersen (Personal show 2011).

Bente Skjøttgaard °1961 in Denmark is showing at Puls Gallery for the forth time. Her work has been exhibited widely in Europe, USA and in South Korea. In 2010 she was selected for the Biennale in Vallauris, France.

“My latest works, Pink Clouds, came from a completely contradictory idea-materializing light and fleeting weather phenomena in static clay and glaze.

Clouds are ephemeral. They come and go and can assume all sorts of shapes and color combinations, often in a matter of moments. In terms of form and design, practically anything goes and there is an enormous amount of inspiration to be gained from studying them.

Cumulus clouds are a kind of puffy cloud with clearly defined edges. They are also called good-weather clouds and have a rather cauliflower-like shape with a flat base. When one makes a simple line drawing of a cloud, it is often this type of cloud that one draws-a rectangular figure with a flat base and bulging upper edge. Cumulus clouds can appear alone, in lines, or in clusters. As a rule, cumulus clouds are not tall, but if the atmosphere is very unstable, they can pile up and form a large Cumulonimbus, or ’bad-weather cloud’. This type is also referred to as ’king of the clouds’ and is highly distinctive, with its large anvil-like shape at the top.

Clouds are typically light at the top and darker at the bottom. This is because the sun shines on them from above. Sometimes one can see rainy weather approaching as dark, vertical lines. This phenomenon has been the inspiration for the thin, vertical ’stems’ that can be seen in some of my works in this exhibition. Pink cloud color comes usually as the sun is setting or rising. It is actually a filtering of sunlight through the water vapor that makes up the cloud. It is a kind of reflection. The horizontal layers of glaze, the result of dipping the objects several times into large tubs of glaze, illustrate the typical changes of color in clouds or horizontal lines. But their purpose is also to carve straight lines through all the organic squiggles that do not have any particular form and that in reality could continue to change endlessly. Lines can also help bind several clouds together to form a larger cloud field.

I am showing two examples of such cloud fields, as well as cumulus clouds on walls at the Puls Contemporary Ceramics Exhibition”.

Bente Skjøttgaard